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#44 - 04/22/02 01:54 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
Equalizer Offline
Member

Registered: 02/12/01
Posts: 525
Loc: Scotland
... I just re read what you said and in answer... yes, I do have some examples I can upload for you.

I'm going out just now, but first thing tomorrow I'll post up some stuff for you to listen to.

Stay cool
_________________________
David

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#45 - 04/23/02 08:47 AM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
tekminus Offline
Member

Registered: 04/20/00
Posts: 1287
Epu, you can add new reverb-tails yourself, if you have the gear. I saw a tutorial on this a long time ago in Future Music. The results were pretty impressive.

-tek

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#46 - 04/23/02 02:17 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
epu Offline
Member

Registered: 02/20/00
Posts: 466
THanks for the info Tek and Eq. hat are the legalities from sampling kits off of records. Supposed I sampled hits (meaning the bass drum and snare drum) from Stevie Wonder's Superstition (there is a four measure drum intro if you remember). Wouldn't someone be able to pick up on that right away? Could one get in trouble for that.

I've always stayed away from doing this for fair of legal issues.

Thanks,
The Infamous Epu.

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#47 - 04/23/02 04:46 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
optinone Offline
Member

Registered: 11/06/01
Posts: 109
Loc: St. Cloud, MN USA
EPU-
That is why I sample just the sounds and not the whole loop. Takes some Drum hits/sounds from a bunch of different recordings, tweak em in your favorite software or sampler and Bada Bing---> new drum loops! I don't know how well this works with using Stevie W's Recording, but hey, it works for me, and the samples are FREE!!!!!

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#48 - 04/23/02 05:12 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
Equalizer Offline
Member

Registered: 02/12/01
Posts: 525
Loc: Scotland
Opti- but don't you find that using loops produces more realistic results?

Whenever I've tried making a drum beat up piece by tiny piece it's often ended up sounding like it's coming from a drum machine.
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David

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#49 - 04/24/02 08:49 AM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
optinone Offline
Member

Registered: 11/06/01
Posts: 109
Loc: St. Cloud, MN USA
EQ-
Ya know, when I try putting a loop together in Wavelab, I don't get very good results(probably cause im not good at that). So I just put the drum hit sample in my sampler and then sequence a "loop" using midi. Its probably not the right way, but It works good for me. As for sounding like a drum machine, Yes it does, but I use all Electronic sounding drum samples anyway. Im not concerned with what sounds "real" and what sounds like a Drum machine. Im tickled pink by the fact that my sampler sounds like a drum machine, a drum machine nobody has. Also, It offers way more sounds than any drummer has demonstrated with there puny 5 peice and 7 peice drum sets. (they always be speedin up too!)

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#50 - 04/24/02 10:09 AM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
Munsie Offline
Member

Registered: 10/13/01
Posts: 37
"As for copyright?"

Hey, it might be fun to rip samples from commercial recordings for your own personal use, and you can probably get away with using them in a live gig. But no one who is going to produce anything on a commercial level is going to do this without getting a license from the original publisher. Otherwise, you are indeed breaking the law and are asking for trouble down the road. That's why it's SOOO hard to get clean samples, loop libraries. And why so many that sell them advertise "clean". This way they are telling the end user they are not ripped, so no copyright issues to worry about.

Another cool way to get fat original sounding drums is to simply layer two kits at the same time from your favorite sound modules/samplers. I combine a hip hop kit with a nice acoustic kit and get an excellent sound! Works even better if you "ever slow slightly" delay the timing on one of the kits, and pan 1 kit a tad to the left and the other kit a tad to the right.
_________________________
Yah I know, stupid ain't I?

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#51 - 04/26/02 11:55 AM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
optinone Offline
Member

Registered: 11/06/01
Posts: 109
Loc: St. Cloud, MN USA
Interesting
I heard if you change it enough, there is nothing they can do about it.
For example a snare drum sound on a commercially recorded CD. How are they even gonna prove anyone took the snare sample from a commercial recording if the sound criminal edited it heavily so it sounded different? It would be like using the sampled sound as a template or a foundation, and then the sound criminal builds on that foundation to create whole new works of madness, until the original foundation/template wasn't recognizable anymore.

Ethically, you should get the lisence, especially if it is a blantant rip-off of the actual work.

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#52 - 04/26/02 02:53 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
Equalizer Offline
Member

Registered: 02/12/01
Posts: 525
Loc: Scotland
Sorry I haven't been able to follow up and post some samples as promissed.

You mentioned Superstition...

Well, if you're desperate to get *that* drum sound but don't want to steal from the album, then let me know what tempo your song's at and I'll see what I can do for you.
_________________________
David

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#53 - 04/29/02 10:42 PM Re: People - Let's talk about DRUMS.
Munsie Offline
Member

Registered: 10/13/01
Posts: 37
> I heard if you change it enough, there is
> nothing they can do about it.

This is an urban myth that goes around in the novice circles. Every sampled piece that ends up in a commercial song. that was used from a published song, gets licensed and then royalties are paid. As for users like you and me who probably won't have a top 40 hit, sure, go ahead and rip away. But if you take your music seriously, you don't want to do this. You never know when something commercially viable is going to come out of your sequencer and the last thing you want is to get sued by the copyright holder. Actually, with most commercial publishers, even the smaller ones, they flat out will ask you to sign a document that your samples are clean or licensed.

But let's reverse this for a sec, if your goal is to blantanly rip some loops from a commercial track, and then use it as background to your music, go ahead. What usually will happen is the copyright holder will get a hold of you at some point and you will be required to pay royalties. But THIS only happens if your tune is on the radio. Did you know the artist/publisher get paid each time their tune is played on the radio?

> For example a snare drum sound on a
> commercially recorded CD. How are they
> even gonna prove anyone took the snare
> sample from a commercial recording if the
> sound criminal edited it heavily so it
> sounded different? It would be like using
> the sampled sound as a template or a
> foundation, and then the sound criminal
> builds on that foundation to create whole
> new works of madness, until the original
> foundation/template wasn't recognizable
> anymore.

This is also a myth. The bottom line, you will only get busted if your tune ends up getting played on the radio, downloaded from the internet, or ends up on some kind of commercial cd. Ever hear of watermarking? This is a digital id that is embedded in most all audio formats today. The naked ear can't hear it. But you can "view" it with proper decoding software. The technology has been around for a few years now. Some users argue it was being done as long as 20 years ago. But it really started being used when the rap/dance/loop type stuff started happening. Then they could simply run the decoder software in a court of law, or similar legal venue, freak the artist out, and collect royalties.

With today's tools, libraries, sound modules, there really is no need to steal samples from un authorized sources. Be original, tweak the sounds you have now! Or spend a few bucks and buy some good libraries.
_________________________
Yah I know, stupid ain't I?

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