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#38406 - 02/15/01 07:37 PM above 18kHz
moz Offline
Member

Registered: 02/04/01
Posts: 38
Loc: manila, philippines
considering 16 bit 44.1kHz sound, is it important for your monitors to be able to produce sounds above 18kHz?

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#38407 - 02/18/01 06:00 PM Re: above 18kHz
TheSonicEnergyAuthority Offline
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Registered: 07/14/00
Posts: 307
Loc: Peterborough,Cambridgeshire,UK
Depends on your hearing.....

On average, people can hear to around 15Khz, some beyond that.
As you get older, you do start losing the ability to hear high frequencies.
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#38408 - 03/02/01 06:35 PM Re: above 18kHz
MORPH! Offline
Member

Registered: 07/25/00
Posts: 296
Loc: Laguna Beach, California, Unit...
Absolutely Yes.
It not involved with your audibility of the given frequency itself but the segmenting subhamonics of the tone that is within the audible spectrum.
The sharpest ears hear no higher than 16,000Hz
If anyone can hear higher than 18,000Hz, then they are a freak of nature, and hear....pirate radio?
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#38409 - 03/03/01 05:56 AM Re: above 18kHz
moz Offline
Member

Registered: 02/04/01
Posts: 38
Loc: manila, philippines
but the segmenting subhamonics of the tone that is within the audible spectrum.

morph: what do you mean by this?
if i understood this correctly, then the subharmonics in the audible spectrum would exist even if your monitors do not reproduce the sound, because it is in the signal itself, which means that the reply of The SonicEnergyAuthority still holds true

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#38410 - 03/03/01 05:56 AM Re: above 18kHz
moz Offline
Member

Registered: 02/04/01
Posts: 38
Loc: manila, philippines
but the segmenting subhamonics of the tone that is within the audible spectrum.

morph: what do you mean by this?
if i understood this correctly, then the subharmonics in the audible spectrum would exist even if your monitors do not reproduce the sound, because it is in the signal itself, which means that the reply of The SonicEnergyAuthority still holds true

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#38411 - 03/04/01 09:20 PM Re: above 18kHz
MORPH! Offline
Member

Registered: 07/25/00
Posts: 296
Loc: Laguna Beach, California, Unit...
Everything sonic said regarding audibility is true.
In order for sub-harmonics to segment in the AUDIBLE spectrum (In this case the piloting fq is 18K)it must be placed in a space to allow it to resonate against the intermodulating frequency. It need not be in a pressureized atmosphere, but in an area containing sufficient mass to accomodate for the new frequency created when the two collide together since the creating two. They do not sacrafice their magnitude for their resultant. The collision of the frequencys do not occur in the signal stream itself, as said, only where there is open mass for it to be accomodated. If this were true, I imagine it would sound similar to pink sound (which I believe is the collision of all frequencys in the audio spectrum)
This is one of a few reasons that tube amps have a "warmer" characteristic.
That was one smokin question man! Awesome.

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The band is just fantastic that is really what I think. Oh, by the way which one's.........Jethro?

morphproductions@hotmail.com
MORPH! Group
PO Box 49
Laguna Beach, California 92652-0049
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#38412 - 03/06/01 12:18 AM Re: above 18kHz
moz Offline
Member

Registered: 02/04/01
Posts: 38
Loc: manila, philippines
i think i get it now, which is kinda bad, since i feel the need to buy new near-fields.

pink sound- i think you were actually referring to white noise, which is what you descibed, however, pink noise is white noise with a filter which has a 3dB per octave roll-off that reduces the level as the frequency goes higher: so that you would get a flat frequency response as opposed to white noise, which gets louder as the frequency goes higher.

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#38413 - 03/12/01 11:00 AM Re: above 18kHz
MORPH! Offline
Member

Registered: 07/25/00
Posts: 296
Loc: Laguna Beach, California, Unit...
Yes moz I was, you're right too

pink sound should not have been used by me, for it is an engineering slang for pink noise with substancial bottom end attenuation. It is what our audible sensory would consider as a round about approximate wholeness of pink noise to our ears...which along the lower bandwidth spectrum, is a helluv a lotta attenuation in order to bring about a subtle rumble too! The only hardware device I have ever known to have this feature is a UREI eq made for Motion picture production.
OMG! someone else into audio as much as me!
LOL so, who is YOUR doctor? LOL LOL
(they have not yet identified my disorder! LOL)

------------------
The band is just fantastic that is really what I think. Oh, by the way which one's.........Jethro?

morphproductions@hotmail.com
MORPH! Group
PO Box 49
Laguna Beach, California 92652-0049
_________________________
MORPH! Sound

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